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Class B final: Rye Neck stuns Bronxville

Saturday, November 1st, 2014

LAGRANGEVILLE – Luis Galeano recognized the moment for what it was. He had two defenders to beat, time running out, and a scoreboard showing a tied game. For a Rye Neck sophomore with something to prove, this was the time to prove it.

“I wanted to take the perfect shot,” Galeano said. “It was late in the game. I didn’t want to waste an opportunity.”

Fired into the left side of the net, Galeano’s second goal of the night gave Rye Neck a stunning 3-2 win against Bronxville for the Class B sectional final at Arlington High School on Saturday night. Galeano broke away from two defenders and scored the game-winner with less than two minutes to play.

“He’s a special player, he really is,” Rye Neck coach Bryan Iacovelli said. “He’s got soccer awareness, and more than that, just his competitiveness. He just hates to lose. He plays the game that way. You saw it today. He fought for those two goals. Especially that last one.”

With only three seniors in the starting lineup, Rye Neck is a team of underclassmen that came into this game as an underdog. Not only was this Bronxville’s seventh finals appearance in nine years, but when these two teams met during the regular season, Bronxville won in a 4-0 blowout.

But that score was deceiving.

Rye Neck played that early October matchup with multiple starters out of the lineup, including Galeano – the team’s leading scorer this season – who was suspended because of too many yellow cards.

The official record with show that these teams had played one another once before, but with Rye Neck at full-strength, this was a different story. And Galeano was a difference maker.

“We wanted Bronxville because that 4-0 loss was just awful,” Galeano said. “We wanted our revenge, and I’m very glad we got it today.”

After the teams traded unusual goals early in the first half — Bronxville scored on a shot that trickled off the left post; Rye Neck tied it on a ball that somehow got past the Broncos defense – Galeano’s first go-ahead goal came with just under 20 minutes to play in the first half, and it was emphatic.

He cut across the field from left to right, fired a rocket into the back of the net, and put Rye Neck in front 2-1. The Panthers greatest weapon had made his presence felt, and he immediately ran up the sideline, tugged at his jersey, and thrust a fist in the air.

A little more than 10 minutes into the second half, Bronxville captain Mike Crawford corralled a ball on the left side of the goal and fired a quick shot that tied the game at 2, but the Rye Neck defense – led by Rich Barrios and Will Galeano — kept it there until opportunity present itself.

“From Day 1, they said this is what they wanted, and they came out and did it,” Iacovelli said. “That’s what’s satisfying to me. This is what they wanted, and they came out and accomplished it.”

What Keeps Cuomo Tossing and Turning at Night?

Thursday, August 21st, 2014

Andrew Cuomo’s worst nightmare isn’t Rob Astorino. Nor is it Preet Bharara and the Moreland mess– at least not for now. No, his immediate fear is “The Cantor Effect.” Read here: cantorhttp://lohud.us/1tkPgv5

Farmers lead sustainable food symposium at WCC

Friday, March 21st, 2014

Mike Fedison, assistant farm manager at Hilltop Hanover Farm, will be one of five featured speakers at the “Five Farmers Meet You at the Table: A Conversation on Sustainable Food Systems” from 8:30 to noon on Saturday, March 29 at Westchester Community College’s Gateway Center- Davis Auditorium in Valhalla. Admission is free.

In this file photo, Mike Fedison prepares the spring crop at Hilltop Hanover Farm.

In this file photo, Mike Fedison prepares the spring crop at Hilltop Hanover Farm.

Joining Fedison will be fellow panelists Jack Algiere, Stone Barns Center for Food and Agriculture; Doug DeCandia, Food Bank for Westchester; John McDowell, Rockland Farm Alliance; and Steffen Schneider, Hawthorne Valley Farm.

This interactive discussion will focus on connections: new relationships with food and farmers, cost/benefit of a healthy food system, and call for community action: every step matters. Closing remarks will be presented by Joan Dye Gussow, teacher, author, and organic producer.

Though free, a suggested donation of $10 would be appreciated. All proceeds will be given to the Food Bank of Westchester. Seating is limited, and pre-registration is required. To reserve a seat go to www.eatrightwrda.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yorktown veterans, students hold annual Four Chaplains ceremony

Monday, January 20th, 2014

Yorktown veterans will join with “Living History” students from Mildred Strang Middle School and residents of Yorktown at 2 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 2, at the Yorktown American Legion Hall at 235 Veterans Road in Yorktown Heights to celebrate the annual Chapel of the Four Chaplains ceremony.

This annual ceremony honors four U.S. Army chaplains who were aboard the U.S. troopship, Dorchester, in February 1943 when it was torpedoed and sunk in the North Atlantic.  These chaplains of different faiths handed out life vests and calmed the soldiers aboard their dying ship.  When the chaplains ran out of life vests to hand out, they gave up their own life vests to save others.  Their bravery was an inspiration to all who survived the sinking and all who heard of it.  These Americans are remembered at this ceremony for their bravery and their interfaith cooperation in helping their fellow soldiers in their greatest time of need.

Each year numerous “Living History’ students in their colonial militia uniforms with their teacher, Chris DiPasquale, open the ceremony with the formal presentation of the nation’s colors. Four prominent local clergy members are part of the ceremony: Mother Claire Woodley of St. Mary’s Episcopal Church in Mohegan Lake; Rabbi Robert Weiner of Temple Beth Am in Yorktown Heights; Pastor Dan O’Brien of Calvary Bible Church in Yorktown Heights; and the Rev. Thomas Kreiser from St Patrick’s Church in Yorktown.

Light refreshments will be served at the post hall after the ceremony.  All veterans and members of the public are invited to attend this free event.

UPDATE: Rockland officials making plans for sex trafficking, domestic violence, Super Bowl

Monday, October 7th, 2013

Gearing up for the Super Bowl in February, Rockland law enforcement officials and advocates for women will put human sex trafficking first and 10 on their game plan.

During a news conference at 2:30 p.m. (today) Monday, they (will) outlined their plans prior to the National Football League’s showcase game at MetLife Stadium in the New Jersey Meadowlands – the home of the Jets and the Giants.2013 STOP FEAR Press Conference 020

A main issue for law enforcement is that major sporting events like the Super Bowl have attracted the sex trade industries. The majority of domestic minor sex trafficking victims are 12 to 15-year-olds who are runaways or who have been abducted and are often forced into compliance with violence, threats and drugs, they said.

In effort to prepare law enforcement and educate the public, Rockland advocates will host a special training session on Oct. 30 for first-responders, hotel and motel staff and the general public called, “Human Trafficking and the Super Bowl: What We Need to Know in Rockland.”

The session will be held at 6:30 p.m. at Good Samaritan Hospital by the Polaris Project, which is involved with combating human trafficking and modern-day slavery.

The STOP F.E.A.R. Coalition, established on 1986 to respond to domestic violence, already has laid the groundwork for the training on human sex trafficking during a meeting on Sept. 25.

“As a county we have done an excellent job creating a coordinated response to survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault,” said Kiera Pollock, deputy executive director of programs and services at Center for Safety & Change, and co-chair of the Human Trafficking Sub-Committee of the STOP F.E.A.R. Coalition.

“Now we must put our efforts into addressing the multitude of needs that survivors—both minors and adults—of human trafficking may need in Rockland especially in light of the upcoming Super Bowl,” she said.

District Attorney Thomas Zugibe and Clarkstown Police Chief Michael Sullivan said law enforcement is gearing up to ensure children are not exploited and take an aggressive approach in Rockland, where local hotels and motels expect to get business from people attending the marquee event in New Jersey.

The 16th Annual STOP F.E.A.R. conference on Nov. 1 will focus on human trafficking and the Super Bowl.

Continuing the theme of Human Trafficking and the Super Bowl, the training, “Preparing for National Security Events: A Perspective on Human Trafficking for Investigators and Front Line Officers,” is geared towards criminal justice professionals. The featured speakers will be Chris Bray from the Phoenix Police Department, an expert on child trafficking, and Eric Pauley from the FBI”s “Innocence Lost Project”, an expert on investigating all matters involving sexual exploitation of children as keynote speakers.

The news conference today at the county office building on New Hempstead Road in New City will include District Attorney Thomas Zugibe, County Executive C. Scott Vanderhoef, Legislature Chairwoman Harriet Cornell, and officials of the Rockland Center for Safety & Change, the former Rockland Family Shelter.

The advocates also will promote October as National Domestic Violence Awareness Month – which has been celebrated nationwide for 32 years.

Additional Domestic Violence Awareness Month Events include:

– Oct. 24: Walk with me, a silent student-led procession at 12 p.m. at Rockland Community College, room 3214

– Nov. 10: 34th Annual Harvest Auction, 5:00 p.m. New York Country Club, New Hempstead; $90 per person, Silent Auction with cocktails and hors d’oeuvres; life auction with dinner and dessert, RSVP for the Auction or to complete a journal ad visit www.centerforsafetyandchange.org.

The Center for Safety & Change is a non-profit. grass-roots organization serving survivors of domestic violence, sexual assault and all crime victims. The center is located at 9 Johnsons Lane, New City. The 24-hour hotline number is 845-634-3344.

PHOTO: Carolyn Fish, the longtime leader of Rockland Center for Safety & Change, formerly Rockland Family Shelter, accepts proclamation from Rockland County Executive C. Scott Vanderhoef

Tuesday’s schedule

Tuesday, September 10th, 2013

Here is Tuesday’s schedule, with my picks in bold:

Yorktown at Peekskill, 4:30 p.m.
Panas at Arlington, 4:30 p.m.
Mahopac at Brewster, 4:30 p.m.
Ketcham at Hen Hud, 4:30 p.m.
Putnam Valley at Arlington B, 4:30 p.m.
Haldane at Pawling, 4:30 p.m.
Somers at John Jay, 4:30 p.m.
Briarcliff at Byram Hills, 4:30 p.m.
Kennedy at Lourdes, 4:45 p.m.

State Legislature proposes harsher penalties for killing police dogs, horses

Tuesday, May 21st, 2013

Legislation dictating harsher penalties for those who kill or injury police dogs and horse while they are on duty was adopted Tuesday by the state Assembly and Senate.

Assemblyman Kenneth Zebrowski, D-New City, was a main sponsor of the proposal in the Assembly.

State and local law enforcement agencies increasingly rely on these animals in crime solving, rescue and recovery operations. Under current law, killing a police animal is a misdemeanor.

The legislation passed by both houses on Tuesday would make harming the animals a felony, punishable by up to 4 years in prison, the highest penalty for killing an animal in the state.

“The role of police animals has significantly expanded over the past few years leading to increased use in investigations and apprehensions,” Zebrowski said in a statement “These animals provide protection, assistance and improve public safety.”

“State and local police invest a great deal of time and resources in the training of these extraordinary animals,” he said. “These animals are viewed and respected as ordinary police officers and we should begin to reflect that by increasing the penalty for killing them.”

The rest of the Zebrowski press release says:

Sen. George D. Maziarz, R-C, Newfane, also sponsored the proposed law that helps recognize the important roles these animals have in crime solving, rescue and recovery operations and other duties by creating a felony-level offense.

“Police animals do a remarkable job protecting and serving the citizens of this state,” Maziarz said in a statement released by Zebrowski’s office.

“In 2011, the Niagara County Sheriff’s Office lost their K-9, Rocky, when he fell off a roof tracking clues regarding a robbery,” Maziarz said. The use of police animals is increasing and they continually undertake tasks that our own police officers do. It is time that we provide these animals the protection they deserve under the law when they are injured or die in the line of duty.”

In addition to the loss of Rocky, another high-profile death of a police animal came in March 2013 when Ape, a newly-trained FBI dog, was fatally shot as police searched for Kurt Myers – a suspect in the deaths of four people in Herkimer.

“The role of police animals has significantly expanded over the past few years leading to increased use in investigations and apprehensions,” Zebrowski said. “These animals provide protection, assistance and improve public safety. State and local police invest a great deal of time and resources in the training of these extraordinary animals. These animals are viewed and respected as ordinary police officers and we should begin to reflect that by increasing the penalty for killing them.”

Photo: Assemblyman Kenneth Zebrowski

Westchester Cycle Club welcomes spring with Bike Shop Tour Series

Friday, March 22nd, 2013

The Westchester Cycle Club held the first of its Spring Bike Shop Tour Series at Bicycle World in Mount Kisco on Wednesday, March 20.

The club has partnered with area bike shops to encourage people to get out, get fit, be safe and have fun riding. Evenings include food, demonstrations and socializing.

With a beer garden theme, the Bicycle World program was held upstairs, and participants sampled local brews from Captain Lawrence Brewery, wine, non-alcoholic beverages and German food.

Discussion topics included bike handling techniques, proper gear selection, getting the most training benefits from your time on the bike and mechanical tactics.

Programs will be held next week and throughout April. All programs $25 and are from 6:30 p.m. -9 p.m. Future programs include:

Danny’s Cycles, 644 Central Ave., Scarsdale; Wednesday, March 27. Manufacturer representatives will speak about wheels and clothing.

Hastings Velo, 45 Main St., Hastings-on-Hudson; Monday, April 1. A demonstration of the latest in electronic shifting and discussion the virtues of a custom bicycle. Food by David Dibari of the Cookery.

Hickory and Tweed, 410 Main St., Armonk; Monday, April 8. Helmets, bike clothing, specifically bibs and shorts, followed by a discussion about triathlon bikes.

Yorktown Cycles, 1899 Commerce St. Yorktown Heights; Wednesday, April 10. Dr. Stuart Weitzman will address different nutrition or fuel requirements for your rides – from shorter rides or races to Century or Iron distance rides.

Signature Cycle, 1899 Commerce St., Greenwich, Conn., April 18. Learn more about frame materials and have your questions answered about differences and attributes of carbon, steel and titanium bikes. Cuisine from Tarry Lodge.

WCC members can register on the WCC website www.westchestercycleclub.org under Events. All others please contact Events Organizer Flori Doyle to register: Floricdoyle@gmail.com . All welcome, but registration is limited, so register early.

The Westchester Cycle Club is a not-for-profit organization that has been riding since 1975. Annual membership ($20) provides a variety of member-led rides – beginner through expert – throughout Westchester as well as Putnam, Dutchess and Fairfield (Conn.) counties. For more information on the club or to become a member, please visit www.westchestercycleclub.org.

 

            Left to right: Eric Marcos, owner of Bicycle World, with organizer Flori Doyle and some Westchester Cycle Club members at first event.

Haverstraw Elks hosting Rockland cop recognition night on March 21

Wednesday, March 6th, 2013

Rockland police officers will be honored on March 21 during the Haverstraw Elks Lodge 877’s 41st Annual Law Enforcement Recognition Night.

The event starts with cocktails at 7 p.m., followed by a prime rib dinner and ceremony. The honors include outstanding investigative award, unit appreciation award, and civilian award.

Rockland District Attorney Thomas Zugibe is the scheduled speaker.

For more information and a list of contacts, for $35 tickets, go to http://www.rcpba.org/pdfs/2013_Elks_FLIER.pdf or call Spring Valley Officeer Phil Fantasia at 845-356-7400 or Sheriff’s Office Detective Hank Bender at 845-638-5446. cq

Rockland Sheriff’s Office offers free gun locks

Wednesday, January 30th, 2013

The Rockland Sheriff’s Office will offer free firearm locks for county residents who possess firearms.

Starting Friday, the Sheriff’s Police Division will begin to disseminate firearms cable locks.

• These cable locks will be provided to Rockland residents free-of-charge, on a first come, first received basis.
• In an effort to provide these devices to the maximum number of residents, a limit of four cable locks per household has been established.
• Persons seeking to receive the locks will be asked to complete a voluntary basic information form. If a person chooses not to complete the form, they must display visual proof of residency to the issuing officer.
• If requested and if time permits, the issuing officer will explain how to install the cable lock on a firearm.
The Rockland County Clerk’s Office also has been provided with a quantity of these cable lock devices. They will be participating in this distribution program as pistol permit amendment applications are processed.